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Alien Greetings Signal Illust
Signals on the Earth

Astronomers have long struggled to translate the radio wave signals from outer space.

Some of the suspected signals might come from an Alien. Possibly they were trying to communicate with us.

Now, astronomers are looking for the source of that signal by using artificial intelligence or AI tech.

According to the LiveScience page, recently, astronomers hope to quickly find out what made the signal sent to Earth. And researchers suspect the distance is billions of light-years in space.

The signals have complex and mysterious structures, patterns of peaks, and valleys in radio waves. And it is only played in milliseconds.

So far, the source of the signal is not expected from a simple explosion or other events. That already known to spread surges of electromagnetic energy across space. Astronomers call this strange signal as fast radio burst (FRBs).

Since it was first discovered in 2007, based on the data recorded in 2001, there have been ongoing means to pinpoint the source. However, the FRB arrived at random times and places. Existing human tech and methods of study were not ready to find where these signals come from at that time.

Based on the info from a paper published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society journal. The team of astronomers wrote that they succeeded in detecting five FRBs in real-time using a single radio telescope.

Wael Farah, a doctoral student at the Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. She has developed a machine learning system that recognizes the FRB sign when it arrives at the Molonglo University of Sydney Radio Observatory. The place is near Canberra.

As reported by Livescience earlier, many scientific instruments. It is including radio telescopes, produces more data per second than they can reasonably store.

So they don’t record anything in the best detail except for their most interesting researches. Farah system makes the Molonglo telescope to recognize FRB and switch to its most detailed recording mode, and produce the best FRB recordings.

Based on their data, the researchers estimate that between 59 and 157 FRB that can be detected theoretically spread across the sky every day. The scientists also use direct detection to hunt for related flares in data from the X-rays, optics and other radio telescopes. The hope is to be able to find some events that are seen related to FRBs, but no luck.

However, their research shows that one of FRB’s most bizarre (and frustrating, for research purposes) features seem real. The signal, once arrived, is never repeated. Each one seems to be a single event in space that will never happen again.


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